Articles in Press

January 2018

Volume 2 Issue 1

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Review Article

Effects of Rapid Reduction of Body Mass on Performance Indices and Proneness to Injury in jūdōka. A Critical Appraisal from a Historical, Gender-Comparative and Coaching Perspective

Carl De Crée*

In contrast with the vast amount of literature on rapid reduction of body mass in male wrestlers there is a particular lack of studies on the effects of “weight cutting” in female athletes who compete in weight class events such as jūdō. The advantages of competing in a lower weight category include increased leverage, relative power, and strength. A competitively active jūdōka attempts to build a longterm career in a single weight class to avoid having to overhaul tactical preparations due to having to face many new opponents.

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Research Article

Five-Year Concussion Injury Surveillance of a Countywide High-School Football Program

Jill Steinmetz MS, Tulay Koru-Sengul Ph.D, Raymond Crittenden IV MS, Bryan Pomares MHS, Gillian Hotz PhD*

According to the National Federation of State High School Associations, over 7 million high school students in the United States participate in high school sports every year1. Football is the most popular sport in high school athletic programs with over 1 million participants annually pacing the fields across the US. With a reported 2 million sport related concussions (SRCs) that occur annually, concussions are the leading cause of mild traumatic brain injuries in the United States.

 

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Research Article

Does The Drop Jumps Provide A Post-Activation Potential?

Andrigo Zaar*, Rafael dos Santos Meirelles, Filipe Matos, Francisco Saavedra, José Manuel Vilaça Maio Alves

The aim of this study was to investigate the use of drop jumps (DJ) to promote post-activation potential (PAP) and to improve the performance of vertical jump (VJ). For that purpose 15 Volleyball male athletes (19,88±1,54 years old), were conducted randomly: (I) a countermovement jump control (CCMJ); (II) 6 sets of DJ, followed by 4 minutes of passive rest and 3 CMJ (PDJ); (III) 5RM Smith Machine squat (SMS), followed by 4 minutes of passive recovery, and then 3 CMJ (PSMS). All activities had an interval of 72 hours between them. Jump height and power was measured with a jump platform.

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     PDF  |  FullText

 

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Review Article

Perception of Risk Factors of Injuries among Amateur Runners: Qualitative Study of Cognitive Evaluations and Behavioural Responses

Andrigo Zaar*, Elísio Alves Pereira Neto, Adenilson Targino Araújo Junior, Thales Henrique Sales, Maria do Socorro Cirilo de Sousa

The search for better daily habits in favour of health and quality of life results in the adherence to the sports modalities practice, among them the street running race. However, running can also cause injuries, especially in the lower extremities. The objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries and the perception of race-related injury (LRC) risk factors attributed by recreational runners. Seventy-seven runners from both sexes (47 males and 30 females) aged from 30 to 51 years old were submitted to a semi-structured interview.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     PDF  |  FullText